Are you left eye dominant or right eye dominant?

Like hands, people also have preference on which eye to use, mostly it is involuntary. This might come as a shock to many because it appears that both eyes are at work, when in fact only one is more focused than the other. This can go on for years without significant disadvantages, but for certain sports like archery, shooting, golf, darts, and anything that involves accuracy and dexterity.

(image source)

 

Disadvantages


As said earlier, if you are involved (or would want to be involved) in sports requiring targeting like archery, golf, and shooting, you may find it a little uncomfortable if you are right-hand dominant while being left-eye dominant. Take for example while on a shooting range, aiming using your right eye while being left-eye dominant and right-hand dominant will actually decrease your accuracy and reaction speed because your right eye is not used to doing those kind of things.

Another perfect example is for surgeons. Surgery requires precise hand movements, everything within a surgery requires the hands and eyes to be perfectly accurate. Don’t worry if you are having trouble with being one-eye dominant because it can be fixed (see below).

 

Simple Test to Find Your Ocular Dominance


There are several tests to find your eye dominance, here I will lay out the common and easiest one.

  1. Extend your arms in front of you
  2. Follow the image above
  3. Using the small opening on the web of your hands, try spotting a small object (a dot, your cat, light bulb, etc.)
  4. Close your left eye. If you can still see the object then you are right-eye dominant.
  5. Close your right eye. If you can still see the object then you are left-eye dominant.

 

Fix


If being one-eye dominant is a problem you’ve been experiencing for a long time, or you just want to get out of it, you can fix it by suppressing your dominant eye’s vision, thereby forcing your other eye to do the job and rewire your brain. A home-made eye patch will do or just simply close your dominant eye several minutes a day. You can also try leaning your less dominant eye towards the object you are looking at. If you’ll notice, your dominant eye is usually leaning towards the object you are looking, try changing that.

Good luck!

Rean John Uehara

Rean is a writer and editor of 1stwebdesigner. He regularly writes about freelancing, technology, web design, and web development. Check out what he's currently up to at reanjohnuehara.com!

Comments

  1. Hillary Onan says

    I am a pediatric ophthalmologist. DO NOT FOLLOW THIS MISGUIDED ACVICE. The visual pathways are only malleable up until age nine or so. The ONLY way to switch a child’s dominant eye is to patch the dominant eye long enough to cause ENOUGH VISION LOSS TO MAKE THE VISION WORSE THAN THE NON-DOMINANT EYE. It is truly a tragedy when the child is then too old to reverse this damage. Don’t believe that right handed people with left eye dominance are doomed to second class status. My practice partner and I are intra-ocular surgeons and my husband is a spine surgeon. Before undertaking treatment that will affect your child for the rest of their life, including ultimately limit certain career choices, consider consulting a practitioner who has actually had training in neurophysiology, neurodevelopment, and pediatric ophthalmology. Many of the “practitioners” who treat eye dominance “problems” have no formal training. Those of us who truly care about children’s visual health find this shocking.

  2. CynicalBloke says

    Thought I was right-eyed, but then a thought popped into my head and I tested it. The results actually depend in what side you approach the object. If you are moving your hands leftwards toward the object (your left), you’ll always seem right-eyed. Vice versa for the left-eye results.

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